Promoting Creative Thinking/ Is My Job Candidate Open to Humor?

March 25, 2010

Chapter 8 pg’s 189-191 Lead With Love By: Gerry Czarnecki

 One strategy for prompting creative thinking is to play the “yes and …” game. It starts with one person tossing out an idea that can be practical or zany, and each person in turn has to add to the idea by saying “yes and,” then adding something to it. For example, a leader might gather his creative team together to discuss ways to increase public awareness of the company. The first idea might be “We should host an event”; the next person might say, “Yes and it should have a memorable theme”; the next might say, “Yes and there should be a contest,” etc. By having only “yes” replies, there is no fear of being wrong; furthermore, the spirit and nature of the session are based on fun. Even if the ideas become impractical as the chain of “yeses” continues, there will likely be a few suggestions or kernels of creativity that may ultimately lead to an “aha.”

 For associates to be able to participate in this sort of freestyle thinking and sharing, they have to be open to humor. Everyone knows how to laugh, but there are some individuals who will find it challenging to lighten up and enjoy levity in the workplace. They may have the same fears that leaders have: that they won’t be taken seriously or will appear unprofessional. It is the leader’s responsibility to establish the humor precedent and help the associates to join in the fun. This is another aspect of associate development that is truly important for long-term success. Associates who can’t learn to lighten up and maintain a healthy attitude will ultimately be those who turn over or burn out.

 In establishing a workplace that embraces humor, leaders also need to consider whether potential hires are a good fit in that environment. The

 tone of a job interview is typically serious, and candidates will most likely behave in a strictly professional manner. #is presents a problem for leaders to gauge a candidate’s humor quotient. To the extent that it is possible, try to put the candidate at ease and take note of whether the individual smiles often. If appropriate, tell a joke or humorous personal story and see if it elicits a laugh. When it is truly hard to assess whether a candidate can lighten up, address the issue openly. Explain that your team takes work seriously but laughter and fun are part of the culture. Ask the candidate if that is an environment in which he or she would be comfortable.

 Use the clues from body language, attitude, and dialogue to determine if an individual will mesh with your team and be able to participate in the fun. When faced with difficult circumstances, your ability to use humor to diffuse stress and tension will actually help your associates to regain their focus and enthusiasm. We all try to organize our personal and professional lives so they run smoothly and don’t negatively affect one another. Inevitably there will be times when family will take precedence and interfere with our plans at work. There are also times when work demands a personal plan to be sacrificed or put on hold. A loving boss recognizes that an associate’s happiness and productivity involves more than what goes on at work. When a valued and reliable employee is simply having a bad day, respond in a way that is sensitive. Rather than a reprimand that will make the person feel worse, ease the tension through humor.

 Tell your associate to take a breather of some sort. If one associate is having a bad day, the negative attitude could affect other associates and lower their morale. It could also be evident to customers or clients. By helping the individual in distress, you also help the people who would be interacting with him or her.

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